Appendix II. Religion blogs

The new landscape of the religion blogosphere
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The blogs and bloggers listed on the chart below represent those that were examined in the course of compiling this report. They represent various sectors of the English-speaking—and largely American—blogosphere engaged in conversation about religion, public life, and academia. The list, assembled by The Immanent Frame’s editors, is by no means exhaustive, due simply to the expansiveness of the religion blogosphere.

We welcome nominations for blogs to be considered for inclusion in an additional running list and possibly in future editions of this report. Please send nominations to ifblog@ssrc.org with the name, URL, and a description of the blog.

Name URL Description
All Things Catholic http://ncronline.org/blogs/all-things-catholic John Allen, a correspondent at the National Catholic Reporter, as well as CNN, the New York Times, and elsewhere, gives detailed reports on the inner workings of the Vatican and its role in international affairs.
AltMuslim http://www.altmuslim.com/ AltMuslim’s contributors offer global perspectives on Muslim life, politics, and culture. They present these viewpoints in a variety of formats including interviews, analysis, opinion, media reviews, and photos and videos.
AltMuslimah http://www.altmuslimah.com/ A partner site to AltMuslim “exploring both sides of the gender divide.” Articles probe orthodoxies and their boundaries in the Islamic tradition as they relate to sexuality. Content provided by a number of regular and guest writers.
American Buddhist Perspective http://americanbuddhist.blogspot.com/ Justin Whitaker, an American graduate student in Buddhist Ethics at the University of London, writes often-lengthy posts on topics that range from Pali linguistics to Buddhist practice to academic life.
Archbishop Cranmer http://archbishop-cranmer.blogspot.com/ Written by an anonymous Anglican who takes his name after one of the leaders (and martyrs) of the English Reformation. It focuses mainly on religion and politics in England and gives rise to vibrant comment threads.
Articles of Faith http://www.boston.com/news/local/articles_of_faith A blog by Boston Globe religion reporter Michael Paulson, Articles of Faith provides daily commentary on religion news, a lot of which is centered on Boston and Catholicism.  Paulson links frequently to his and others’ news stories and also puts together the occasional roundup of news coverage on significant events.
At the Intersection http://www.publicreligion.org/blog At the Intersection is the blog for Public Religion Research, a Washington D.C.-based for-profit consulting firm, in their words, “bringing expertise and insight to the intersection of religion, values and public policy.” Many of the blog posts come from Robert P. Jones, PRR’s president and founder. They tend to comment on and analyze survey data and political trends relating to religion in the United States.
Bartholomew’s Notes on Religion http://barthsnotes.wordpress.com/ Since February 2004, British scholar Richard Bartholomew has been keeping an eye on the fringes of religiosity around the world, with special attention to East Asia, Europe, and underreported goings-on among more reactionary elements in the United States. He tends not to comment on the stories garnering headlines at a given moment. Instead, he keeps his eye on the quieter ongoing trends that interest him, often based on his readings of small, sectarian media outlets.
Bible Belt Blogger http://biblebeltblogger.com/ The blog of Frank Lockwood, religion editor at the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette. Offers spirited commentaries, of varying length, on religion news and opinion articles around the Internet. The sidebar includes a ranking of Arkansas’s megachurches and denominations, listed by attendance numbers.
Blog from the Capital http://www.bjconline.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=blogsection The politics blog of the Baptist Joint Committee, Blog from the Capital offers brief commentary on news items and policy debates related to church/state issues from a Baptist, separationist point of view.
Blogging Religiously http://religion.lohudblogs.com/ “Religion writer Gary Stern comments on news and trends in the world of religion — in the Lower Hudson Valley and beyond.” Posts often focus on New York religious politics, but Stern takes on issues of national and international interest sometimes as well.
Bold Faith Type http://blog.faithinpubliclife.org/ As the blog of Faith in Public Life, an organization devoted to supporting progressive religious voices in politics and the media, Bold Faith Type maintains a left-of-center commentary on religion news items. Its authors mainly include the media staff of FPL. Posts often summarize discussion on a variety of other religion blogs and media outlets.
Busted Halo http://www.bustedhalo.com/bustedblog This “online magazine for spiritual seekers” is a project of the Catholic Paulist Fathers, aimed especially at young adults trying to live out their faith in the modern world. It includes basic articles about Catholic teaching, as well as sections about politics, culture, sexuality, entertainment, and more. It also includes audio/video sections and an XM Radio show.
Call & Response http://www.faithandleadership.com/blog This blog from Duke Divinity School includes short essays by scholars largely from a liberal Christian perspective, as well as a daily digest of “News & Ideas.”
Charlotte was Both http://amywelborn.wordpress.com/ Conservative Catholic author Amy Welborn comments on religion in culture and politics, as well as glimpses of ordinary life.
Christianity Today Liveblog http://blog.christianitytoday.com/ctliveblog/ Here, editors and contributors to Christianity Today comment on controversies and news items, especially ones little-discussed outside the evangelical community. Posts include modest editorializing, but mainly point to things of interest on the internet.
Christianity Today Politics Blog http://blog.christianitytoday.com/ctpolitics/ This group blog by the editors of Christianity Today and others (including bloggers Mark Silk, Steve Waldman, and Dan Gilgoff). Mainly covers religion, especially Christianity, as it relates to national politics stories. The emphasis is on reporting and perspectives much more than opinion.
City of Brass http://blog.beliefnet.com/cityofbrass/ Aziz Poonawalla, an Ismaili Muslim based in Wisconsin, blogs mainly about Islam in major news stories. His posts are often in-depth and full of links to resources around the internet.
Clerical Whispers http://www.clericalwhispers.blogspot.com “Irish RC Priests…Giving The Uncomfortable Truth And News From The Inside…” is how this blog describes itself. It has been much involved in matters related to sexual abuse by priests. In addition to commentary about developments in the Catholic Church around the world, the blog also publishes prayers.
Comment Is Free Belief http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/belief This Webby-winning section of the Guardian’s extensive online opinion section has been running only since late 2008, but it has played host to leading figures including Tariq Ramadan, Mary Midgley, Michael Lerner, Rowan Williams, Tony Blair, and Sue Blackmore. They situate the discussion of religion in the contexts of philosophy, secularism, politics, and culture. Much of it is centered on “The Question,” a weekly prompt which various authors address concurrently and conversationally. The “new atheism” debates figure prominently.
Crunchy Con http://blog.beliefnet.com/crunchycon/ A “conservative politics and religion blog” at BeliefNet by Rod Dreher, editorial columnist for the Dallas Morning News. Dreher was raised Methodist, but converted to Roman Catholicism, and then, to Eastern Orthodoxy. Gives opinionated commentary on national news stories, lesser-known stories, and even inspirational pieces, such as saints’ stories. The blog began in mid-2006 and concluded at the end of 2009, when Dreher became director of publications at the John Templeton Foundation.
Dallas Morning News Religion Blog http://religionblog.dallasnews.com/ When the Dallas Morning News closed its well-regarded religion section, its reporters started this blog to compensate. Most posts now are framed as questions to the “Texas Faith” panel, an interfaith group of religious leaders and thinkers in Texas.
Damian Thompson http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/damian_thompson Written by the editor-in-chief of the Catholic Herald. Offers commentary on current events in the U.K. and abroad from a conservative Catholic perspective. Posts often cover debates over Catholic liturgy and Catholic-Anglican Church relations.
dotCommonweal http://www.commonwealmagazine.org/blog A blog from Commonweal magazine’s editors and contributors, dotCommonweal, like the magazine, is written from a liberal lay Catholic perspective. Also like the magazine, dotCommonweal’s content is politics-centered.  Posts can range from a simple link to more in-depth commentary on an issue, and readers actively participate in the discussion through the comments section.
Ekklesia http://www.ekklesia.co.uk/blog The blog of Ekklesia, a London-based think tank interested in church/state issues with a theologically liberal, usually Christian, perspective. A handful of bloggers comment on international and British news items, especially lesser-known ones that relate to Ekklesia’s interests. There are no user comments.
Elephant Journal http://www.elephantjournal.com/ A print magazine that, online, operates in blog format. It covers “Yoga, Sustainability, Politics, Spirituality” with a young, hipster bent. Posts include articles, interviews, and multimedia.
Episcopal Cafe http://www.episcopalcafe.com/ A group site about the Episcopal Church, including The Lead, a blog that deals with church affairs and politics, an “Art Blog,” and others.
Evangelical Outpost http://evangelicaloutpost.com/ Perhaps more magazine than blog, Evangelical Outpost publishes articles on news and culture (as well as more esoteric topics like philosophy and “pop semiotics”) “from an evangelical worldview.” Many of the contributors are young evangelical journalists.
Faith and Theology http://faith-theology.blogspot.com/ Australian-Anglican theologian Ben Myers writes this popular “blog for theological scholarship and contemporary theological reflection.” Posts are often lengthy, literary, and are rarely news-driven.
FaithWorld http://blogs.reuters.com/faithworld/ Written by Reuters religion reporters, posts are serious explorations of religion news items they’re covering that venture somewhat outside the normal constraints of news reporting, including opinionated perspectives and the stories behind the news. International coverage is particularly strong.
First Things blogs http://www.firstthings.com/blogs/firstthoughts/ and several others Written by First Things staff and writers, First Thoughts carries an ongoing discussion about the magazine’s articles, as well as goings-on on the internet in news, culture (both low and high), and religion. Commentary tends to be brief and opinionated, reflecting First Things’s conservative approach. There are also a handful of specialized blogs on the site by particular authors. One, Evangel, is an evangelical group blog.
GetReligion http://www.getreligion.org Written by a team of seasoned journalists who lean conservative, GetReligion carries on an ongoing commentary about how religion is portrayed in the media. Posts include analysis of one or more particular news stories, shedding light on the reporting and editorial processes that were going on behind the scenes and offering pointed critique. Comments threads are active and usually substantive.
God & Country http://www.usnews.com/blogs/god-and-country Until God & Country was discontinued at the end of 2009, U.S. News & World Report journalist Dan Giloff followed religion mainly as it finds its way into major national news stories. With the eye of a political insider, he comments on religious trends as they might affect alignments in Washington. As a reporter, he regularly has access to leading figures and offers insights about them on the blog.
God Blog, The http://www.jewishjournal.com/thegodblog/ As a feature on the website of the Los Angeles-based Jewish Journal, Brad A. Greenberg maintains spirited commentary on the religion headlines, often bringing little-known perspectives to bear. Greenberg is a Christian working for a Jewish site, but his coverage—which began in March of 2007—is hardly sectarian. He has a particularly good eye for how religion plays out in American popular culture.
God’s Politics http://blog.sojo.net/ A group blog on religion and politics led by Jim Wallis, founder of Sojourners magazine and community. It is devoted to building a progressive evangelical movement.
Holy Post http://network.nationalpost.com/np/blogs/holy-post/ The religion blog of the National Post, a Toronto-based conservative paper. It posts often lengthy articles by a variety of authors, including both breaking news and commentary.
Immanent Frame, The http://blogs.ssrc.org/tif/ A collective blog publishing interdisciplinary perspectives on secularism, religion, and the public sphere. Authors are almost entirely academics writing serious but accessible reflections, sometimes relating to current events. Also includes a filter blog, “here & there” with links to related articles from around the internet.
In All Things http://www.americamagazine.org/blog/blog.cfm?blog_id=2 The group blog of America, “the National Catholic Weekly,” In All Things offers opinionated commentary on news that relate to the Catholic Church and its role in politics and culture.
Inside Islam http://insideislam.wisc.edu/ A project of the University of Wisconsin and Wisconsin Public Radio, this blog and radio series includes interviews, essays, and dispatches about the culture and politics of Islam.
International Religious Freedom News http://becketinternational.wordpress.com IRFN is maintained by the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, a public interest law firm based in Washington DC. The blog aggregates news related to the active infringement of, and failure to enforce, religious freedom laws across the globe. Posts are brief and written in a journalistic tone. The site’s intention is to compile relevant headlines and link to full articles on a daily basis, as well as to serve as a database for past articles concerning religious freedom law.
Irtiqa http://sciencereligionnews.blogspot.com/ Formerly Science and Religion News, Irtiqa is the blog of Salman Hameed, an astronomer and Assistant Professor of Integrated Science & Humanities at Hampshire College. Since 2006, he has commented on a variety of issues at the confluence of science of religion, with a special focus on the Muslim world. His perspective tends to privilege science at the expense of some of its religious dissenters.
Jesus’ General http://patriotboy.blogspot.com/ Written by an anonymous “graduate of Bear River High in Garland/Tremonton, UT; Weber State University, and The George Washington University,” Jesus’ General is an award-winning, left-leaning blog on the religious right. It is usually satirical in tone.
JTA blogs http://blogs.jta.org/politics/, http://blogs.jta.org/telegraph/ Since January 2009, Ron Kampeas and Eric Fingerhut write on JTA’s website about Jewish affairs inside the Beltway in Capital J. In The Telegraph, JTA editors comment on political and cultural news relating to the Jewish community. Posts, often quite lengthy and informative, privilege news reporting over opinion.
Killing the Buddha http://killingthebuddha.com/ So-called KtB was founded in 2000 by Peter Manseau, Jeff Sharlet, and Jeremy Brothers as “a religion magazine for people made anxious by churches, people embarrassed to be caught in the ‘spirituality’ section of a bookstore, people both hostile and drawn to talk of God.” Highlights have been collected in two print anthologies, Killing the Buddha (Free Press, 2004) and Believer, Beware (Beacon, 2009). Since a relaunch in early 2009, KtB has been publishing several pieces per week in addition to daily posts on the “KtBlog” by the site’s editors.
La Shawn Barber’s Corner http://lashawnbarber.com/ “Independent conservative” La Shawn Barber comments on news, popular culture, and daily life from a pro-life, evangelical perspective. She has been widely-cited in major newspapers and makes appearances on television talk shows.
Martin Marty Center http://divinity.uchicago.edu/martycenter/publications/ At the University of Chicago Divinity School’s Martin Marty Center, the Religion and Culture Web Forum and Sightings are less standard blogs than online newsletters. Scholars write brief essays that bring their research interests to bear on current issues in religion and public life.
Monkey Mind http://monkeymindonline.blogspot.com/ James Ford is a Unitarian Universalist minister and Soto Zen priest. His posts are spiritually wide-ranging, bringing Western and Eastern insights to bear on contemporary issues and interreligious dialogue.
Mormon Inquiry, Beliefnet http://blog.beliefnet.com/mormoninquiry/ Written by Dave Banack, a journalist and attorney who converted to Mormonism at the age of fifteen. Banack discusses issues of church doctrine, as well as culture, and inter-denominational relations. He occasionally comments on events within the greater public sphere, though most posts pertain specifically to issues of interest to those in the LDS church.
Muslim Voices http://muslimvoices.org/blog/ The blog of a site, based out of the University of Indiana, designed to promote intercultural dialogue with global Islam. Posts, by the site’s editors as well as guest bloggers, cover the politics and culture of Muslim-majority countries and, particularly, the diaspora.
Muslimah Media Watch http://muslimahmediawatch.org/ A group blog geared towards critiquing misogynistic, racist, and simplistic representations of Muslim women in popular culture and the news-media, as well as commenting on contemporary events and issues of interest to Muslim women. The website’s contributors, many of whom are students and Ph.D. candidates, identify as Muslim feminists.
MuslimMatters http://muslimmatters.org/ A group site started in 2007 by a pair of Muslim bloggers that discusses issues relevant to Islam, “especially in the West.” Topics include civil rights, religion, politics, and society.
New Humanist Blog http://blog.newhumanist.org.uk/ The online wing of New Humanist magazine, a periodical published by the Rationalist Association and ideologically aligned with New Atheists Dawkins, Hitchens, et al. Posts are terse and often sardonic. They cover a smattering of current events, books, and articles. The authors of the blog are generally dismissive of religion and religious perspectives.
No God Blog http://atheists.org/blog/ The blog of American Atheists, No God Blog delivers snarky commentary on AA activities as well as news and articles around the web about religion.
Of Sacred and Secular http://www.statesman.com/blogs/content/shared-gen/blogs/austin/faith/index.html Of Sacred and Secular is the religion blog of the Austin American-Statesman (Austin, TX). It is written by Joshunda Sanders, the Statesman’s religion reporter. Posts cover religion news, both local and national, and are written in a somewhat conversational, albeit nondescript, journalistic style. In addition to news coverage, Sanders has been visiting various houses of worship in Central Texas and reporting on her experience.
Old Black Church!, The http://theoldblackchurch.blogspot.com/ Ann Brock gives a conservative Christian perspective on African-American, urban culture in the United States.
On Faith http://newsweek.washingtonpost.com/onfaith A collaborative effort between the Washington Post and Newsweek, On Faith provides a forum for intelligent discussion on faith and its global implications. It draws from a pool of scholars, journalists and religious leaders to comment on the latest and most significant questions about religion’s role in society. The site offers a number of topic-specific blogs and columns. Each week the editors, Sally Quinn and Jon Meacham, pose a specific question and a panel of experts offers perspectives on the topic.
Open Source Theology http://www.opensourcetheology.net/ “The purpose of this site is to assist the development of an emerging theology for the emerging church.” This collaborative group blog features on going discussion from a “postmodern,” largely young, Christian perspective.
Patheos http://www.patheos.com/ A for-profit website launched in 2009, Patheos describes itself as “the premier online destination to engage in the global dialogue about religion and spirituality and to explore and experience the world’s beliefs.” Drawing on the expertise of academics, it aims to create a trusted resource for information about religion to non-experts, as well as a hub for topical discussion through articles in its “Public Square” section and blogs. It also features an extensive directory listing of religious organizations.
Pharyngula http://scienceblogs.com/pharyngula/ Part of Seed Media Group’s ScienceBlogs Network, this blog by biologist PZ Myers is best known for clever invective against religious critics of mainstream science. He also weighs in on American politics with a progressive orientation. The big red “A” on his sidebar indicates, as do many of his posts, identification with the New Atheists. Myers has a large number of regular followers and commenters; he has been known to rally them to skew online surveys that speak to his interests.
Point, The http://thepoint.breakpoint.org/ On the website of Chuck Colson’s Breakpoint ministry, “a conversation on current events and Christian worldview.” Comments on news with a conservative evangelical point of view. Includes a “daily roundup” of news stories as well as opinionated commentary by about 25 contributors, ranging from short to long posts.
Progressive Revival http://blog.beliefnet.com/progressiverevival/ With an image of a revival tent in front of the Capitol as its header, this collective blog (headed by Diana Butler Bass and Paul Raushenbush) is devoted to the fostering of a religious coalition steeped in progressive politics. “Both,” the site says of its authors, “stand firmly within the Mainline Protestant tradition.” Posts generally take the form of substantial, serious, analytic essays.
ProgressiveIslam.org http://progressiveislam.org/ Orchestrated by American Muslims, ProgressiveIslam.org is “an online community and a super blog for Muslims of all theological orientations and any one else with an interest in issues relating to Islam, empowerment, freedom, equality and authenticity.” In addition to front page articles, there is a section for blog posts by readers. The emphasis is on discussion of reformist causes in global Islam.
Prosblogion, The http://prosblogion.ektopos.com/ An academic philosophy of religion blog established in 2004. It is a group blog maintained by Matthew Mullins, a Ph.D. student at Northwestern University. “Individuals interested in becoming a contributor to Prosblogion should have an established reputation in the field, a recommendation from a current contributor, or a history of contributing to the life of blog (sic.) as a commenter.”
Read the Spirit http://www.readthespirit.com/ Through book reviews, recommendations, and interviews, this site headed by David Crumm curates a selection of works that amount to an interfaith spirituality infused with social conscience.
Religion Clause http://religionclause.blogspot.com Howard M. Friedman, an emeritus professor of law at the University of Toledo in Ohio, blogs prolifically (to the tune of half a dozen or more posts in a day) about church/state issues in the United States. He mainly summarizes news articles on the Internet, without much commentary or personal interjection. The archives go back to 2005.
Religion Dispatches http://www.religiondispatches.org/ Religion Dispatches began in early 2008, providing daily original reporting and commentary about religion and politics from a progressive perspective. In the process, it has also provided a common space for both religion scholars and journalists to discuss religion in public life. Areas of interest include popular culture, electoral politics, sexuality, technology, science, and civil rights.
Religion in American History http://usreligion.blogspot.com Religion in American History is a self-described “group blog to foster discussion and share research, insights, reviews, observations, syllabi, links, new books, project information, grant opportunities, seminars, lectures, and thoughts about religion in American history and American religious history.”  Edited by Paul Harvey and Kelly Baker, the blog is updated daily with a variety of material and also provides more permanent links to teaching resources and other discussion forums.
Religion News Blog http://www.religionnewsblog.com Published by the Christian counter-cult organization Apologetics Index, the RNB focuses on often under-reported trends in the world of new religious movements and religious freedom around the world. The blog mainly consists of text clipped from news articles, occasionally with brief, highly opinionated commentary.
Religion News Service Blog http://www.religionnews.com/index.php?/rnsblog “The only secular news and photo service devoted to unbiased coverage of religion and ethics—exclusively.” Their blog includes roundups of religion in the news and commentary on major news items.
Revealer, The http://www.therevealer.org Published by New York University’s Center for Religion and Media, The Revealer is a daily review of religion in the news and news about religion.  The blog separates its press critiques into three categories: today (for shorter observations), timely (for longer, newsier pieces), and timeless (for the more evergreen criticism).
Sarah Posner http://www.prospect.org/cs/author?id=1314, http://www.religiondispatches.org/bloggers/sarahposner/ Journalist Sarah Posner writes about the Religious Right for The American Prospect with an inside-the-beltway perspective. In 2009, she moved from the Prospect to Religion Dispatches.
Scoop, The http://www.uscmediareligion.org/?theScoop Diane Winston, who holds the Knight Chair in Media and Religion at the University of Southern California, is the driving force behind The Scoop, a blog about religion in the media. It focuses on how news media reports (or doesn’t report) religion and offers insightful commentary on religion in other media forms such as television and film. The goal of the website is to “serve as a resource for journalists, including journalism educators and students seeking new models for covering politics, science, sex and gender among other key issues for the 21st century.”
Seeker, The http://newsblogs.chicagotribune.com/religion_theseeker/ The Chicago Tribune’s religion blog is Manya Brachear’s self-described “personal and professional quest for truth.” Posts comment on news events, and are written in a non-polemical, journalistic style. She often, at the end, invites readers to comment, giving rise to sometimes quite active comment threads.
Shambala SunSpace http://www.shambhalasun.com/sunspace/ The blog of the Shambala Sun, an American Buddhist magazine. The blog features commentary by the Sun’s editors on recent publications, debates within Buddhism, and wider social issues.
Slacktivist http://slacktivist.typepad.com/ Calls itself a “politically liberal weblog featuring commentary on contemporary evangelicalism as well as social issues.” The author, Fred Clark, is a magazine editor in Pennsylvania with experience in Christian organizations. Posts are long, literate, and thoughtful. They’re relevant to current events, often, but they’re also wide-ranging and perennial. One particularly popular series is his ongoing commentary on the Left Behind books.
SOF Observed http://blog.speakingoffaith.org/ The blog of Speaking of Faith, Krista Tippett’s American Public Media radio show. Producers give background on current programs and comment on religion in the news.
South Jerusalem http://southjerusalem.com/ Written and published by Jerusalem-based journalists Gershom Gorenberg and Haim Watzman, South Jerusalem is billed as a “ Progressive, Skeptical Blog on Israel, Judaism, Culture, Politics and Literature.” Its emphasis is on Israeli politics and culture with an especial focus on the post-1967 occupation, as well as modern Judaism and Jewish/Israeli literature. Blog posts also cover Palestinian politics and society, U.S.-Israel relations, and the role of religion in Israeli life. Gorenberg is a correspondent for The American Prospect and the author of several books. Watzman is a prolific author, journalist, and translator.
Spiritual Politics http://www.spiritual-politics.org Spiritual Politics is Mark Silk’s blog on religion and American political culture.  Silk, director of the Center for the Study of Religion and Public Life at Trinity College which publishes the blog, provides informed commentary on new stories on a range of political issues including abortion, same-sex marriage, and church-state controversies.
State of Belief Blog http://stateofbelief.com/blog/ The blog of State of Belief, C. Welton Gaddy’s radio show on religious progressive politics. The blog discusses current programs on the show as well as commenting on religion in the news.
Steven Waldman http://blog.beliefnet.com/stevenwaldman/ Beliefnet.com editor-in-chief and co-founder Steven Waldman is a veteran religion journalist. He comments on religion and politics from a perspective that spans across political divides. He has also been involved in the growing movement to forge a new progressive religious coalition on issues like abortion. Ended on November 20, 2009, when Waldman left Beliefnet to work for the FCC.
Street Prophets http://streetprophets.com/ Affiliated with the popular liberal politics blog Daily Kos, Street Prophets is a group blog edited by Rev. Daniel Schultz, a UCC minister. It calls itself “the online forum that mobilizes progressive people of faith to name, discuss and take action on critical political and religious issues.”
Suhaib Webb http://www.suhaibwebb.com Blog and podcasts from an American Muslim convert studying at Al-Azhar in Cairo. Winner of “Best Blog” from the 2009 Brass Crescent Awards. Posts often come from guest writers, or are simply reprinted from other publications. They generally deal with Islamic spirituality and social activism.
Talk to Action http://www.talk2action.org “Talk to Action is a platform for reporting on, learning about, and analyzing and discussing the religious right—and what to do about it.”  Co-founded by Bruce Wilson and Frederick Clarkson, contributors update the blog daily and readers play an important role by ranking comments and becoming “trusted users.”  Talk to Action’s ultimate goal of providing this forum for discussion of the religious right is to encourage readers to take action and “reclaim citizenship, history, and faith.”
Theolog http://www.theolog.org As “the online community of the Christian Century,” Theolog’s mission is to facilitate discussion between the magazine and its readers at a faster pace than the print medium allows. Posts tend to be substantial and reflective, including book reviews and sermons. The perspective, as with Christian Century, is liberal, mainline Protestant. Contributors include the magazine’s staff, as well as scholars and clergy.
thinkBuddha.org http://www.thinkbuddha.org/ These “wayward thoughts on the Buddhist way” come from Will Buckingham, a UK-based Buddhist teacher and philosopher. He offers reflections on Buddhist spirituality and its intersection with intellectual life.
Tikkun Daily Blog http://www.tikkun.org/tikkundaily/ Daily comments on the news from a progressive Jewish perspective, written by Tikkun magazine editors, including Rabbi Michael Lerner.
Tricycle Editors’ Blog http://www.tricycle.com/blog/ As the blog of the editors of the Buddhist magazine Tricycle, it includes posts about the magazine’s content, as well as commentary and links about Buddhist engagement with social concerns.
Vox Nova http://vox-nova.com The about page of this Catholic collective blog says, “Vox Nova is free, to the furthest extent possible, from partisanship, nationalism and demagoguery, all of which banish intellectual honesty from rational discourse.” Their banner image is suggestive; portraits of Catholic saints line the top, and culture-shapers, from Aristotle to Bono, line the bottom. The site aims to put both in dialogue. Many of the contributors have their own blogs as well. Posts range from thoughtful commentary on the timely to book reviews and nearly academic theological reflections.
Wall of Separation, The http://blog.au.org/ The blog of Americans United for Separation of Church and State, The Wall provides daily commentary on news and legal milestones related to church/state issues. It takes a strong disestablishmentarian perspective. The voice tends to be informal and polemical, likely expecting the audience to be mainly in agreement.
Way of Improvement Leads Home, The http://www.philipvickersfithian.com/ John Fea, a professor of American history at Messiah College, offers commentary on “the intersection of American history, religion, politics, and academic life.” Blog posts focus on American religious history, current dilemmas concerning the role of religion in public education, and questions regarding the religious inflection of historical narratives. Messiah College, where Fea professes, is “committed to an embracing evangelical spirit rooted in the Anabaptist, Pietist, and Wesleyan traditions of the Christian Church.”
Whispers in the Loggia http://whispersintheloggia.blogspot.com/ The Internet’s preeminent source of gossip on the Catholic Church. Rocco Palmo’s blog has earned him columns at The Tablet and Busted Halo, and he has commented on the Church for a number of major outlets, including the New York Times, Associated Press, the San Francisco Chronicle, BBC, National Public Radio, the Washington Post, and more. While he often treads in genuine gossip, Palmo’s obsessive attention to the inner workings of the Church often lends unique insights that escape the conventional wisdom. San Francisco Chronicle, BBC, National Public Radio, the Washington Post, and more. While he often treads in genuine gossip, Palmo’s obsessive attention to the inner workings of the Church often lends unique insights that escape the conventional wisdom.
Wild Hunt, The http://wildhunt.org/blog/ A leading blog on paganism by Jason Pitzl-Waters, an artist and writer. Discusses paganism in a worldwide context, offering news and discussion about non-monotheistic religions in societies around the globe. Posts are often long with considerable hyperlinking.
Windows and Doors http://blog.beliefnet.com/windowsanddoors/ Rabbi Brad Hirschfield’s BeliefNet blog, “where politics and pop culture meet 3,000 years of Jewish wisdom.” It tends to offer sober commentary on the news cycle, especially when there is a connection with Jews or Judaism that isn’t elsewhere well explored.

The new landscape of the religion blogosphere
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