Appendix I. Bibliography

The new landscape of the religion blogosphere
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Althouse, Ann. 2006. “Exposed in the Blogosphere.” In Can Blogging Derail Your Career? 7 Bloggers Discuss the Case of Juan Cole. The Chronicle of Higher Education. http://chronicle.com/free/v52/i47/47b00601.htm.

Arnold, Jill and Hugh Miller. 2001. “Academic Masters, Mistresses, and Apprentices: Gender and Power in the Real World of the Web.” Mots Pluriels 19. http://www.arts.uwa.edu.au/MotsPluriels/MP1901jahm.html.

Baoill, Andrew. 2004. “Weblogs and the Public Sphere.” In Laura Gurak, Smiljana Antonijevic, Laurie Johnson, Clancy Ratliff, and Jessica Reyman (editors), Into the blogosphere: Rhetoric, community, and culture of weblogs. http://blog.lib.umn.edu/blogosphere/.

Barlow, Aaron. 2008. Blogging America: The New Public Sphere. Westport, CT: Greenwood Publishing Group.

Baron, Naomi. 2008. Always On: Language in an Online and Mobile World. New York: Oxford University Press.

Bérubé, Michael. 2006. “The Attention Blogs Bring.” In Can Blogging Derail Your Career? 7 Bloggers Discuss the Case of Juan Cole. The Chronicle of Higher Education. http://chronicle.com/free/v52/i47/47b00601.htm.

BitchPhD. 2006. “The survey says …” Bitch Ph.D. http://bitchphd.blogspot.com/2006/02/survey-says.html.

Blood, Rebecca. 2000. “Weblogs: A History and Perspective.” Rebecca’s Pocket. http://www.rebeccablood.net/essays/weblog_history.html.

Borgman, Christine L. 2007. Scholarship in the Digital Age. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Boynton, Robert. 2005. “Attack of the Career-Killing Blogs,” Slate. www.slate.com/id/2130466/.

Bruns, Axel and Joanne Jacobs (editors). 2006. Uses of Blogs. New York: Peter Lang.

Campbell, H. 2005. Exploring Religious Community Online: We Are One in the Network. New York: Peter Lang.

Castells, Manuel. 2008. “The New Public Sphere: Global Civil Society, Communication Networks, and Global Governance.” The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 616, no. 1 (March): 78-93.

Cheong, Pauline Hope, Alexander Halavais, and Kyounghee Kwon. 2008. “The Chronicles of Me: Understanding Blogging as a Religious Practice.” Journal of Media and Religion 7: 107-131.

Cheong, P. H. and J.P. Poon 2008. “’WWW.faith.org’: (Re)structuring com-munication and social capital building among religious organizations.”

Information, Communication and Society 11: 89–110.

Cole, Juan R.I. 2006. “Juan R.I. Cole Responds.” In Can Blogging Derail Your Career? 7 Bloggers Discuss the Case of Juan Cole. The Chronicle of Higher Education. http://chronicle.com/free/v52/i47/47b00601.htm.

Communications of the ACM 47, no. 12 (December 2004). Special issue on “The Blogosphere.”

Dahl, Candice. 2009. “Undergraduate research in the public domain: the evaluation of non-academic sources online.” 2009. Reference Services Review 37, no. 2: 155 – 163.

Dawson, Kara M. 2007. “Blog Overload.” The Chronicle of Higher Education. http://chronicle.com/jobs/news/2007/01/2007013001c.htm.

Dawson, Lorne L. and Douglas E. Cowan (editors). 2004. Religion Online: Finding Faith on the Internet. New York: Routledge.

Dayal, Geeta. 2005. “PH.Dotcom: What if professors could lecture 24-7? Blog culture invades academia.” The Village Voice. Tuesday, April 5. http://www.villagevoice.com/2005-04-05/art/ph-dotcom/.

DeLong, J. Bradford. 2006. “The Invisible College.” In “Can Blogging Derail Your Career? 7 Bloggers Discuss the Case of Juan Cole.” The Chronicle of Higher Education. http://chronicle.com/free/v52/i47/47b00601.htm.

Drezner, Daniel W. 2006. “The Trouble With Blogs.” In “Can Blogging Derail Your Career? 7 Bloggers Discuss the Case of Juan Cole.” The Chronicle of Higher Education. http://chronicle.com/free/v52/i47/47b00601.htm.

Economist. 2008. “User-Generated Science.” September 28. http://www.economist.com/sciencetechnology/displayStory.cfm?story_id=12253189.

Ewins, Rory. 2003. “You Are Where? Building a research presence in cyberspace.” Seminar at Edinburgh: Moray House School of Education. http://speedysnail.com/2003/youarewhere/.

Farrell, Henry. 2005. “The Blogosphere as a Carnival of Ideas.” The Chronicle of Higher Education. http://chronicle.com/free/v52/i07/07b01401.htm.

Farrell, Henry and Daniel W. Drezner. 2008. “The Power and Politics of Blogs.” Public Choice 134: 15-30. See online peer-review discussion at http://www.danieldrezner.com/archives/001489.html.

Female Science Professor. 2009. “Everything Is Evaluated.” The Chronicle of Higher Education. http://chronicle.com/jobs/news/2009/04/2009042001c.htm.

Ferguson, Ross, and Barry Griffiths. 2006. “Thin Democracy? Parliamentarians, Citizens and the Influence of Blogging on Political Engagement.” Parliamentary Affairs 59, no. 2: 366-374. http://pa.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/short/59/2/366.

Gill, Kathy E. 2004. “How can we measure the influence of the blogsphere?” Proceedings of the WWW2004 Conference (New York, May 17-22). http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.124.2509&rep=rep1&type=pdf.

Griner, David. 2009. “Web 3.0 is about taming the deluge of data.” The Social Path. http://www.thesocialpath.com/2009/06/taming-the-river-of-data.html.

Haas, Tanni. 2005. “From ‘Public Journalism’ to the ‘Public’s Journalism’? Rhetoric and reality in the discourse on weblogs.” Journalism Studies 6, no.3 (August): 387-396.

Hargittai, Eszter. 2004. “The academic contributions of blogging?” Crooked Timber. http://crookedtimber.org/2004/11/18/the-academic-contributions-of-blogging/.

Hargittai, Eszter, Jason Gallo, and Matthew Kane. 2008. “Cross-ideological Discussions among Conservative and Liberal Bloggers.” Public Choice 134.

Healy, Kieran. 2004. “Gender and blogging.” Crooked Timber. http://crookedtimber.org/2004/12/17/gender-and-blogging.

Kaufman, Scott Eric. 2006. “A post in two parts: The first will bore you; the second, infuriate.” Acephalous. http://acephalous.typepad.com/acephalous/2006/02/a_post_in_two_p.html.

Kotsko, Adam. 2007. “A Skeptic’s Take on Academic Blogs.” Inside Higher Ed. November 1. http://www.insidehighered.com/views/2007/11/01/kotsko.

Krause, Steven D. 2002. “Where Do I List This on My CV?” Version 1.0. CCC Online, hosted at stevendkrause.com. http://www.stevendkrause.com/academic/2002CCC/.

Krause, Steven D. 2005. “Blogs as a Tool for Teaching.” The Chronicle of Higher Education. http://chronicle.com/weekly/v51/i42/42b03301.htm.

Krause, Steven D. 2007. “Where Do I List This on My CV?” Version 2.0. Kairos. http://kairos.technorhetoric.net/12.1/binder.html?topoi/krause/index.html.

Kuehn, Evan. 2008. “Are Blogs ‘Legitimate Piece[s] of Academic Writing’?” Clavi Non Defixi. http://nondefixi.blogspot.com/2008/09/are-blogs-legitimate-pieces-of-academic.html.

Leiter, Brian. 2006. “Why Blogs Are Bad for Legal Scholarship.” Yale Law Journal Pocket Part 116, 53: 53-58.  http://www.thepocketpart.org/2006/09/20/leiter.html.

Lepore, Jill. 2009. “Back Issues.” New Yorker. January 26. http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics/atlarge/2009/01/26/090126crat_atlarge_lepore.

McKenna, Laura. 2007. “’Getting the Word Out’: Policy Bloggers Use Their Soap Box To Make Change.” Review of Policy Research 24 (May): 209–29.

Mortensen, Torill Elvira. 2004. “Weblogs and the Dilemma of Academia.” In L.J. Gurak, S. Antonijevic, L. Johnson, C. Ratliff, & J. Reyman (editors), Into the blogosphere: Rhetoric, community, and culture of weblogs. http://blog.lib.umn.edu/blogosphere/personal_publication.html.

Mortensen, Torill and Jill Walker. 2002. “Blogging Thoughts: personal publication as an online research tool,” in Morrison (editor) Researching ICTs in Context. Oslo: InterMedia/UniPub. http://www.intermedia.uio.no/konferanser/skikt-02/docs/Researching_ICTs_in_context-Ch11-Mortensen-Walker.pdf.

O’Connor, Erin. 2006. “The Controversy That Wasn’t.” In “Can Blogging Derail Your Career? 7 Bloggers Discuss the Case of Juan Cole.” The Chronicle of Higher Education. http://chronicle.com/free/v52/i47/47b00601.htm.

Olsen, Ted. 2007. “The Death of Blogs.” Christianity Today (October). http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2007/october/13.22.html.

O’Reilly, Tim. 2005. “What Is Web 2.0.” O’Reilly Media. http://oreilly.com/web2/archive/what-is-web-20.html.

Pedersen, Sarah and Caroline Macafee. 2007. “Gender differences in British blogging.” Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication. 12(4), article 16. http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol12/issue4/pedersen.html.

Public Choice 134. 2008. Special issue on “Blogs, Politics and Power.”

Rainie, Lee. 2005. “The State of Blogging.” Pew Internet & American Life Project. http://www.pewInternet.org/Reports/2005/The-State-of-Blogging.aspx.

Reynolds, Glenn. 2006. “The Politics of Academic Appointments.” In “Can Blogging Derail Your Career? 7 Bloggers Discuss the Case of Juan Cole.” The Chronicle of Higher Education. http://chronicle.com/free/v52/i47/47b00601.htm.

Rushkoff, Douglas. 2005. Get Back in the Box: Innovation from the Inside Out. New York: HarperCollins.

Saper, Craig. 2006. “Blogademia.” Reconstruction: Studies in Contemporary Culture 6, no. 4. http://reconstruction.eserver.org/064/saper.shtml.

Schiff, Aaron. 2008. “A Survey of Economics Bloggers.” http://ssrn.com/abstract=1080238.

Schmidt, Jan. 2007. “Blogging practices: An analytical framework.” Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 12, no. 4. http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol12/issue4/schmidt.html.

Shirky, Clay. 2003. “Power Laws, Weblogs, and Inequality.” Clay Shirky’s Writings About the Internet. http://shirky.com/writings/powerlaw_weblog.html.

Smith, Aaron. 2008. “New numbers for blogging and blog readership.” Pew Internet & American Life Project. http://www.pewInternet.org/Commentary/2008/July/New-numbers-for-blogging-and-blog-readership.aspx.

Stelter, Brian. 2008. “Mainstream News Outlets Start Linking to Other Sites.” New York Times. October 12.

Stutzman, Frederic. 2006. “Academic Blogging: The Value of Conversation” Teachers College Record. October 31. http://www.tcrecord.org/Content.asp?ContentID=12817.

Sullivan, Andrew. 2008. “Why I Blog.” Atlantic (November).

Sunstein, Cass. 2001. Republic.com. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Sunstein, Cass. 2007. Republic.com 2.0. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Technorati. “State of the Blogosphere / 2008.” http://technorati.com/blogging/state-of-the-blogosphere/.

Tremayne, Mark (editor). 2006. Blogging, Citizenship, and the Future of Media. New York: Routledge.

Tribble, Ivan. 2005. “Bloggers Need Not Apply,” The Chronicle of Higher Education. http://chronicle.com/jobs/news/2005/07/2005070801c.htm.

Vaidhyanathan, Siva. 2006. “The Lessons of Juan Cole.” In “Can Blogging Derail Your Career? 7 Bloggers Discuss the Case of Juan Cole.” The Chronicle of Higher Education. http://chronicle.com/free/v52/i47/47b00601.htm.

Various. 2006. “Can Blogging Derail Your Career? 7 Bloggers Discuss the Case of Juan Cole.” The Chronicle of Higher Education. http://chronicle.com/free/v52/i47/47b00601.htm.

Waldman, Steven. 2009. “Why the Huffington Post Can’t Replace the New York Times.” Huffington Post. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/steven-waldman/the-case-against-huffingt_b_157075.html.

Walker, Jill. 2006. “Blogging from Inside the Ivory Tower.” In Axel Bruns and Joanne Jacobs (editors), Uses of Blogs. New York: Peter Lang.

Wasik, Bill. 2009. And Then There’s This: How Stories Live and Die in Viral Culture. New York: Viking.

Weatherson, Brian. 2004. “Blogging as Scholarship.” Crooked Timber. http://crookedtimber.org/2004/01/10/blogging-as-scholarship/.

Williams, Jeremy B. and Joanne Jacobs. 2004. “Exploring the use of blogs as learning spaces in the higher education sector.” Australasian Journal of Educational Technology 20, no. 2: 232-247.

Wooden, Cindy. 2009. “Catholic Blogosphere: Council Looks at Promoting Charity, Truth Online.” Catholic News Service. http://www.catholicnews.com/data/stories/cns/0904838.htm.

The new landscape of the religion blogosphere
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