Kristina Stoeckl

Kristina Stoeckl is APART fellow at the Department of Political Science at the University of Vienna and visiting fellow at the project "Religiowest" at the European University Institute Florence. Her latest forthcoming book is The Russian Orthodox Church and Human Rights (Routledge 2014).

Posts by Kristina Stoeckl:

Thursday, February 13th, 2014

The theology blind spot

I have always been puzzled by the fact that Charles Taylor starts his book A Secular Age with a long quote from Bede Griffith in order to describe a religious type of experience. It is the description of a scene experienced by the author as a school-boy: trees are blossoming, birds are singing, the author has the sensation that angels are present and that God is looking down on him. My question is: Why this quote? Why choose an image and a language of sunset, trees and birds in order to describe something for which the different languages of theology have worked out precise and elaborate codifications? I understand, of course, that in the context of the introduction to A Secular Age, Taylor uses this quote in order to make a soft claim to the human openness to experiences of transcendental nature. He uses the rest of the eight-hundred pages of the book to explore why it has become increasingly rare and difficult in our secular age to live these kinds of experiences, let alone to look for them in the context of an organized religious tradition. Most of us, he says, live our lives in an “immanent frame” and religious belief “has become one option among many.”

Read the rest of The theology blind spot.