Claire Ma

Claire Ma is an intern for the SSRC program on Religion and the Public Sphere. She graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Smith College in 2013 with a B.A. cum laude in Government and a minor in Economics.

Posts by Claire Ma:

Monday, December 2nd, 2013

Religious Pluralism and Islamic Law: Dhimmis and Others in the Empire of Law

In his new book, Religious Pluralism and Islamic LawAnver Emon discusses Islamic legal doctrines and their implications for religious diversity and tolerance in Islamic lands.

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Wednesday, October 2nd, 2013

CFP: Working with A Secular Age

On March 6-8, 2014, the University of Bern will host an international conference entitled “Working with A Secular Age: Interdisciplinary Reflections on Charles Taylor’s Conception of the Secular.”

Read the rest of CFP: Working with A Secular Age .
Monday, September 30th, 2013

Law’s fragile state

Mark Fathi Massoud, Assistant Professor of Politics and Legal Studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz, examines the trials and tribulations of law in Sudan in his new book, Law’s Fragile State: Colonial, Authoritarian, and Humanitarian Legacies in Sudan. In an interview with Jadaliyya, Massoud speaks about his motivation to uncover the essence of how law—and lawlessness—operate in the context of fragile states. Massoud also elaborates on his topic in a blog post at the Critical Investigations into Humanitarianism in Africa Blog.

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Friday, September 27th, 2013

Treating religions (un)equally

Earlier this summer, The Immanent Frame published an off the cuff exchange about the State Department’s new initiative to engage religious communities in US diplomacy. Conversation and critiques are still going strong; Elizabeth Shakman Hurd, an original contributor to “Engaging religion at the Department of State,” has penned a commentary for Al Jazeera America in which she critiques US faith-based engagement abroad as a violation of the separation of church and state.

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Monday, September 23rd, 2013

The Invention of Religion in Japan

In the book The Invention of Religion in Japan, Jason Ananda Josephson traces the roots and history of religion in Japan.

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Friday, September 20th, 2013

Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship opening at Williams College

Williams College has posted an opportunity in the Department of Religion. The college seeks a two-year Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Islam in Context, a position that begins in the fall of 2014.

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Wednesday, September 18th, 2013

CFP: Remixing Religion

The University of Texas at Austin has announced a call for papers for the upcoming interdisciplinary graduate student conference, “Remixing Religion,” to be held at UT Austin on April 4, 2014. Please send paper titles and abstracts (300 words or less) to RemixingReligion@gmail.com by November 27, 2013.

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Wednesday, August 28th, 2013

The civil religion of “I have a dream”

This Wednesday will mark the fiftieth anniversary of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s landmark “I have a dream” speech and the 1963 March on Washington. In commemoration of the great moment in American civil rights history, scholars and commentators have dedicated much of this past month to recognizing Dr. King’s legacy. At Religion News Service, Yonat Shimron and Adelle M. Banks offer insights from academics of religion and discuss the speech’s continued relevance.

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Friday, August 23rd, 2013

Ascetic faith in a modern world

Jainism, a religion from India that emphasizes a disciplined adherence to non-violence, is one of the oldest religions in the world. Modern-day Jains, including those born in the United States, are learning to adapt and reinterpret their faith in a modern world.

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Friday, August 16th, 2013

Engaging whose religion?

In late July, The Immanent Frame published a set of reflections on the Department of State’s plans for a new office dedicated to engaging religion. Following an official announcement by Secretary Kerry on August 7th, scholars and policy commentators have continued to weigh in on the implications, challenges, and potential of the new Office of Faith-Based Community Initiatives.

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Monday, August 12th, 2013

CFP: Histories of Sexuality and Religion in the 20th Century United States

Editors Gillian Frank (Stony Brook University), Heather White (New College of Florida), and Bethany Moreton (University of Georgia) have issued a Call for Proposals for a new anthology on Histories of Sexuality and Religion in the 20th Century United States.

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Wednesday, July 24th, 2013

CFP: Varieties of Understanding

The Varieties of Understanding project at Fordham University in New York is a three-year, $3.85 million initiative that aims to fund groundbreaking work in psychology, philosophy, theology, and religious studies.

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Tuesday, July 23rd, 2013

CFP: Why Study Religion?

Illinois State University Philosophy and Religious Studies Department has announced a call for papers for the upcoming conference on religion in higher education, Why Study Religion?, which will be held October 25-26, 2013.

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Wednesday, July 17th, 2013

Preaching after the Trayvon Martin verdict

How can religion aid or complicate the ways in which people make sense of the trial of George Zimmerman and understand its social implications? Since the verdict, religious centers across the country have become spaces for healing, prayer, and process for religious members of different faith communities. Elizabeth Drescher and Dan Webster also discuss the verdict’s implications on how they comprehend God, the law, and their responsibility in society.

 

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Thursday, July 11th, 2013

CFP: Gender & Society

The Committee for the Study of Religion at the CUNY Graduate Center has announced a call for papers for its Special Issue of Gender & Society.

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Tuesday, July 9th, 2013

Buddhists, Time, and religious unrest in Burma

At Religion Dispatches, Alan Senauke writes about Time magazine’s July 1st issue and its consequences in Burma.

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Monday, July 8th, 2013

CFP: Media and Religion

The Center for Media, Religion, and Culture will hold its fifth annual conference on Media and Religion: The Global View in January 2014.

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Wednesday, July 3rd, 2013

Judge rules yoga not a threat to separation of church and state

A judge in California ruled on Monday that teaching yoga in public schools does not violate the U.S. Constitution’s separation of church and state. The ruling came as a response to a lawsuit brought forth by parents in the Encinitas school district, in which the parents argued that teaching yoga in public schools was a form of indoctrination.

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Wednesday, June 26th, 2013

SCOTUS roundup: Rulings on DOMA and Prop 8

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5 to 4 on Wednesday that the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), a 1996 law that denied federal benefits to legally married same-sex couples, is unconstitutional. The Court also declined to rule on Proposition 8, a California case that banned same-sex marriage, on technical grounds, deciding that the case was improperly before the Court. The following roundup presents a range of reactions from both sides, with a focus on the religious aspects that have long influenced this debate.

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Tuesday, June 25th, 2013

Ways of Knowing: Graduate Conference on Religion

Harvard Divinity School is hosting its annual Ways of Knowing conference for graduate students and young scholars who are studying religion in all different programs and disciplines. The conference will be held at Harvard Divinity School in Cambridge, MA on October 25-26, 2013 (more details here). The deadline to submit papers is July 1, 2013.

Read the rest of Ways of Knowing: Graduate Conference on Religion.