Steven Barrie-Anthony

Steven Barrie-Anthony is an editor at large for The Immanent Frame, a senior editor for Reverberations, an SSRC research associate for projects on religion & the public sphere, and a doctoral student in Religious Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He was formerly a staff writer with the Los Angeles Times. He tweets at @barrieanthony

Posts by Steven Barrie-Anthony:

Tuesday, March 5th, 2013

Prayer, imagination, and the voice of God—in global perspective

Tanya Marie Luhrmann is a psychological anthropologist and a Professor of Anthropology at Stanford University. Her work explores how people come to experience nonmaterial objects such as God as present and real, and how different understandings of the mind affect mental experience. She is the author, most recently, of When God Talks Back (Knopf, 2012), which The New York Times Book Review called “the most insightful study of evangelical religion in many years,” and of other books including Of Two Minds (Knopf, 2000), The Good Parsi (Harvard, 1996), and Persuasions of the Witch’s Craft (Harvard, 1989). Her latest project, supported by the SSRC’s New Directions in the Study of Prayer initiative, builds on and extends her research for When God Talks Back, taking her to India and Africa. On a recent rainy afternoon in Palo Alto, I spoke with Luhrmann about her work and its new directions.

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Saturday, November 3rd, 2012

Peter Manseau on religion as America’s “first freedom”

New Directions in the Study of Prayer grantee Peter Manseau observes that both the Obama and Romney campaigns describe religious liberty as America’s “first freedom,” a characterization that has “become so commonplace that it seems churlish to question it.” But Manseau finds that what constitutes the first freedom has historically been far from clear-cut, and […]

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Thursday, October 18th, 2012

Elizabeth Hurd on reimagining religious freedom as resistance

Elizabeth Shakman Hurd, co-Guest Editor of the TIF discussion series The politics of religious freedom, reflects on the sometimes paradoxical effects of the state promotion of religious freedom—and argues that Canada’s proposed Office of Religious Freedom should adopt a more nuanced, less top-down approach.

Read the rest of Elizabeth Hurd on reimagining religious freedom as resistance.